The Tula is a stylish portable audio recorder with AI noise cancellation

EngadgetThe Tula is a stylish portable audio recorder with AI noise cancellation

Ever since we all started spending more time at home, I’ve had to pay especially close attention to production gear — we’re now shooting our videos and handling our live streams away from our old office, after all. So far, I’ve struggled most with audio, especially when recording on the (socially distanced) move, which makes the new Tula mic an especially tantalizing option.

You probably haven’t heard of Tula before, but you may be familiar with founder David Brown and his other microphone brand: Soyuz. They’re best known for their strikingly designed, tremendously expensive TUBE microphones, seen in any number of the company’s YouTube videos. Needless to say, recordings sound great — as they should from a $3,000 microphone. The Tula is different: it’s a surprisingly flexible portable recorder that promises quality audio and clever features for $199.

The first thing you’ll notice about the Tula is its design — while not nearly as ostentatious as a Soyuz, it shares a sense of old-school whimsy lacking in more « professional » gear like, well, anything Zoom makes. With its tiny flip-out stand and metal-and-plastic chassis, the Tula manages to come off as practical and adorable at the same time. (Or, « practicadorable, a word I will now use incessantly.) Just because it’s sort of cute doesn’t mean the team cut corners on controls — The Tula is festooned with buttons to tweak gain, skip through files, toggle ambient noise cancellation, and play back recordings. Honestly, there’s enough going on here that you’ll probably have to keep the tiny manual handy at first.

Tula

But enough about that; how does this thing sound?

I spent part of an evening crooning and playing bass badly in my basement — can you tell I miss karaoke nights? — and came away mostly impressed with the Tula as a mobile recorder. Unlike our managing editor Terrence O’Brien, I’ve never really recorded myself playing anything before, so you could probably do without my less-than-professional opinion. Still, on the whole? Not bad at all, though I’m sure not doing the Tula’s Burr Brown op amps justice.

To me at least, the Tula makes much more sense as a proper production tool. For one, the Tula also plays nice with TRRS lavalier mics like the one I wear when I shoot the to-camera bits of our review videos. I haven’t been able to justify buying the sort of fancy wireless lav mic we used to use when shooting hands-on videos at briefing sites, but knowing I could run my cheapo lav directly into the Tula and sync with camera footage later is something I’m looking forward to trying in the field. And it certainly doesn’t hurt that I haven’t had to recharge this thing yet; Brown says the Tula can record for up to 12 hours with its AI-powered noise canceling on, or up to 17 hours without it.

That noise cancellation, by the way, might be one of the big reasons to splurge on a Tula instead of something like a Zoom H1n. It’s designed to eliminate the low-level ambient sounds that pervade even the quiet rooms in our homes, and it certainly seems to handle those situations well. To really get a feel for how well the noise cancellation works, though, I fired up a hefty electric fan in my basement and started talking:

(Also, I’m a dummy — I meant TOS communicators, not tricorders.)

The Tula also pulls double duty as a USB mic that connects to Macs and PCs, and despite its size, it stacks up favorably to the two other desk mics I use frequently: Blue’s mostly venerable Yeti and the much-better Audio Technica ATR-2100X I use for all our streams. That’s at least partially because of the flexibility it offers — you can toggle the Tula between cardioid and omnidirectional mic modes, either — the former is better for straight talking while the latter is well-suited for in-person group chats.

To get a sense of just how well the Tula stacks up, I did my best impression of an audiobook narrator and read the first lines of a favorite novel into the Tula and the Audio Technica, and the results were surprising:

I should quickly note here that both mics were connected to my work laptop via USB-C and were positioned the same distance away from my face. The Audio Technica mic did a really nice job here, reproducing my voice with even-keeled tones and notable substance in the low end. The Tula, meanwhile, sounded completely different: it in some ways sounds fuller, but I didn’t get nearly as much meat in the low end. That said, how good these samples sound compared to each other depends a lot on what you’re using to listen to them — through a pair of Sony earbuds, the Audio Technica clip sounded better, but the Tula’s rendition felt more satisfying through a MacBook Pro’s speakers. Your mileage may vary, but I’d feel plenty comfortable tucking the Tula into my bag and using it as a portable podcast rig.

The only knock against using the Tula with a computer is its size; it’s ideal for a device meant to travel with you, but the Tula’s is a little too short to capture quality audio if it’s sitting on a desk inches below your mouth. (Brown says the team plans to release a multitude of mounts so you can prop up the Tula properly, but for now, I’ve had to settle for a pile of books.)

While on-the-go audio professionals swear by their Zoom recorders — with good reason — the Tula is charming and competent enough in most scenarios that it could be worth the splurge for the stylish audio nerd. And who knows? The Tula has grown on me so much that I might start using it in our upcoming livestreams.

https://www.engadget.com/tula-usb-c-microphone-portable-recorder-soyuz-noise-cancellation-140048009.html

Sent with Reeder

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Father of the Web Tim Berners-Lee Prepares ‘Do-Over’

Hacker News Father of the Web Tim Berners-Lee Prepares ‘Do-Over’

(Reuters) – Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the British computer scientist who was knighted for inventing the internet navigation system known as the World Wide Web, wants to re-make cyberspace once again.

With a new startup called Inrupt, Berners-Lee aims to fix some of the problems that have handicapped the so-called open web in an age of huge, closed platforms such as Facebook.

Building on ideas developed by an open-source software project called Solid, Inrupt promises a web where people can use a single sign-on for any service and personal data is stored in “pods,” or personal online data stores, controlled by the user.

“People are fed up with the lack of controls, the silos,” said Berners-Lee, co-founder and chief technology officer of Inrupt, in an interview at the Reuters Next conference. This new, updated web, Berners-Lee said, will enable the kind of person-to-person sharing and collaboration that has helped make the big social media services so successful while leaving the user in control.

John Bruce, a veteran technology executive who is CEO of Inrupt, said the company had signed up Britain’s National Health Service, the BBC and the government of Flanders in Belgium as pilot customers, and hoped to announce many more by April.

Inrupt’s investors include Hearst Ventures, Octopus Ventures and Akamai, an internet content delivery firm. Bruce declined to say how much has been raised.

Bruce said the NHS pilot was addressing the long-standing problem of incompatible medical records. With Inrupt, he said, the NHS could give everyone “a holistic presentation of your medical history,” with various doctors and other service providers able to update that record even as it remains in the users control.

A key aim for Inrupt is to get software developers to write programs for the platform. Inrupt, like the original web, is at its core mostly a set of protocols for how machines talk to one another, meaning that specific applications bring it to life.

“The use cases are so broad, it’s like a do-over for the web,” Berners-Lee said.

For more coverage from the Reuters Next conference, please click here here or.

To watch Reuters Next live, visit here

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-tech-bernerslee-interview/father-of-the-web-tim-berners-lee-prepares-do-over-idUSKBN29H1JK

Sent with Reeder

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Gamification : A new approach for employee onboarding.

eLearning Learning Gamification : A new approach for employee onboarding.

Gamificationwww.indusgeeks.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Why-adopting-game-based-training-is-a-right-choice-67-480×270.jpg 480w » sizes= »((min-width: 0px) and (max-width: 480px)) 480px, ((min-width: 481px) and (max-width: 980px)) 980px, (min-width: 981px) 1024px, 100vw » data-unique-identifier= » »>

As digitalization keeps evolving and in a manner have started taking control over the workplace, onboarding programs are moving ceaselessly from traditional data over-burden to approaches like virtual reality training, gamification, simulations, and many more ways that spread out data throughout some period. As we all know, employee onboarding is a vital process of getting new hires into the fold by providing them with all the rational training and providing with the tools which will get them ahead and be successful. Truth be told, a very much planned onboarding program has appeared to build consistency standards and increase profitability levels at a much faster pace.

At times, people misunderstand the actual meaning of gamification, it is about taking components from computer games to make an interactive, hands-on training module. An effective gamified measure comprises connecting business objectives with advancement, continuous criticism, progress following, accomplishments and rewards, and consummately timing the conveyance of data to forestall data over-burden. Probably the best illustration of gamification in regular day to day existence is the utilization of loyalty points just like how it is at any retail store. In employee onboarding training, such elements make the employees learn at a fast pace and finish the course on time with effective results. 

How gamification can be implied easily, here are a few tips/points:

  • Virtual tour
    New employees have to know what the organization is about, the goals and objectives, how working takes place. Quite possibly the best approach to develop it is by exhibiting the organization’s set of experiences and culture. Employees will see the internal activities and how it’s become large in the long term and the one who feels an association with the organization is bound to stay. They will likewise be compelling brand delegates for your clients and customers, which means expanded benefits.
  • Quests
    Using gamification quests is another fabulous method to improve new employee onboarding inside the organization. The thought behind it is that they can be applied to any training aspect. Exploring from the underlying issue to sorting it out and lastly solving it whole, has its rush. This is a typical strategy used to build their commitment and retention.
  • Progress and rewards
    From the earliest starting point, any little accomplishments that employees achieve has to be rewarded. Rewarding for the completion of training doesn’t propel employees to push more earnestly during the onboarding stage. What works anyway is to reward them all through the onboarding training period so they feel valuable to the organization. And while the training is ongoing, the management can track one’s progress and evaluate based on the same. 
New employee onboarding is a chance to make an extraordinary first encounter for fresh recruits and set out a guide that guarantees long haul achievement. Gamification can likewise help empower consistent learning and commitment by making the training program all the more intriguing, giving better occasions to communicate with new employees and review their performance and give feedback. The correct training program won’t just enormously improve maintenance and efficiency yet also cut down turnover costs as well.

At Indusgeeks, we create high fidelity learning/training simulations specific to your needs and work with you to ensure that the outcome of your program is higher. Our solutions are available on desktop, mobile, tablet, and browser-based, making it accessible anywhere and everywhere. #MakeanImpact

http://www.indusgeeks.com/blog/gamification-a-new-approach-for-employee-onboarding/

Sent with Reeder

Envoyé de mon iPhone

What Distinguishes Robust Virtual Classrooms?

eLearning Learning What Distinguishes Robust Virtual Classrooms?

Without face-to-face contact, it can be challenging for a trainer to engage learners. A robust virtual classroom platform has tools that effectively nurture and support engagement, giving the facilitator a variety of viable options to involve participants.

eBook Release: Top Considerations When Choosing Αn Enterprise Learning Solution

Top Considerations When Choosing Αn Enterprise Learning Solution
Discover all the criteria you need to consider for delivering effective and impactful virtual training.

The ability for a trainer to appear on a webcam and share his or her screen with viewers is basic to all virtual classroom platforms, however that can quickly become stale. True learning requires interactivity. Industry experts note that engagement is the key to effectiveness, and to engage participants, a full set of features and options is a must. To them, the platforms that stand out are those that include chat, annotation, polling, breakouts, and feedback, among other features.

A facilitator can build interactivity by having participants raise their hands, answer questions in a chat box, respond to polls, and take short quizzes. They can enable authentic communication among workers in different departments and/or geographic locations. They can foster collaboration among co-workers by assigning them to smaller breakout rooms where they can complete assignments together, and then regroup everyone to wrap up and share insights.

Top-of-the line virtual training platforms enable facilitators to more easily read “non-verbal” communication cues in a digital environment, allowing them to gauge how a session is progressing and who might need some extra attention They can leverage platform features to learn who raised their hand, how many people participated in a chat, or who added ideas on a shared whiteboard. This helps the trainer establish meaningful connection with participants, better understand their perspectives, and gain insight as to whether everyone is absorbing the training material.

Finally, a top-of-the-line virtual training solution is designed to make the trainer’s job easier. Facilitators would rather steer clear of software that presents hassles or is difficult to use. The best virtual training solutions are designed with options that streamline course presentation. One example is persistent session rooms, which allows trainers to set up their room(s) in advance. By activating this feature, they can reuse the session room each time they run that same course, which saves a lot of prep time.

Customizable Controls

Sophisticated virtual training platforms allow trainers to control the level of participant activity in their virtual classrooms. Some think this is unnecessary. They caution that disabling the chat function “because it’s distracting” is counterproductive; trainers should actually actively encourage chats and discussion.

Yet there are certainly instances when a facilitator may want or need to do so. Although chat tools are important for engagement, people sometimes use them for backchannel conversations that are not relevant. Facilitators can establish ground rules and suggest that participants use a private chat for offtopic messaging and troubleshooting, however, they may value the option of disabling group chat during certain sessions.

There are other legitimate reasons trainers might want to control participant activity in a robust virtual classroom. Network latency can create delays, and overlapping audio can make it difficult for participants to understand what is being said. A facilitator may request that participants keep their microphones muted when they are not talking, however oftentimes not everyone complies. Having the ability to systematically mute all participants can improve the audio quality of a presentation.

Barring participant activity may also be desirable when a company is delivering a large scale learning event or webinar to hundreds (or perhaps thousands) of listeners. In such cases, it can be overwhelming if everyone is engaging in separate chat conversations.

Chat and audio are not the only functions that a facilitator might want to control. Some virtual trainers might want to filter certain activities. For example: In a large virtual classroom, asking all participants to do an annotation exercise can become unwieldy. In a robust virtual classroom, the trainer could ask only those participants whose birthdays fall in the month of August, for example, to annotate their reactions on a slide.

Security And Privacy

In the early days of the pandemic, a popular online meeting platform fell victim to insidious hacking where interlopers infiltrated business meetings and took over the screen with inappropriate material. The platform addressed the problem by adding features such as password protection and waiting rooms that organizations could deploy in order to control access and refuse entry to unwelcome visitors.

Similar security and privacy considerations exist in virtual training platforms. Sensitive corporate data or planned rollouts that the company wants to keep secret could be copied or stolen during virtual training sessions. The best virtual training platforms have measures in place to protect against such disasters.

Legally and ethically, learning environments should be safe spaces. Participants must be able to speak freely and share stories without worrying about sabotage. While not all sessions require top-level security, trainers can protect their virtual classrooms from malicious intruders by making sure their platforms have state-of-the-art security and privacy features in place.

Conclusion

Your training program needs a learning solution that can offer the robust virtual classroom that you need. Download the eBook Top Considerations When Choosing Αn Enterprise Learning Solution and learn how to choose the option that is best for you.

eBook Release: Adobe Captivate Prime

Adobe Captivate Prime – A full featured LMS with a learner-first approach

https://elearningindustry.com/what-distinguishes-robust-virtual-classrooms

Sent with Reeder

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Les applications PHP, C++, Java et .NET sont les plus fréquemment défaillantes, selon un rapport de Veracode

Flux général Developpez Les applications PHP, C++, Java et .NET sont les plus fréquemment défaillantes, selon un rapport de Veracode

Avatar de scandinave
La seule chose que dit cette étude, c’est que les langages massivement utilisés sur le web ont plus de faille web, les langages utilisés pour du système n’ont pas ces failles mais d’autre comme la gestion des erreurs et enfin les langages utilisés pour, entre autre, des calculs/maths ont des problèmes avec de la crypto. Bref rien de nouveau sous le soleil.

16  2 
Avatar de grunk
Cette étude est-elle pertinente ou pas ?

Quel intérêt « d’accuser » un langage quand c’est le developpeur derrière qui est responsable du problème.Que 75% des app PHP comporte des failles XSS comparé à seulement 31% en javascript veux seulement dire que les dév JS sont plus sensibilisé à cette problématique particulière.Quelle est l’échantillon analysé ? Y’a t’il autant d’application de chaque langage ? Parce que si dans le lot j’ai 50% de wordpress pas à jour forcément ca fausse les résultats.

Est ce que c’est que du backend ? Front + back ? Parce que par exemple ne pas voir de problème de XSS sur du C++ alors qu’il n’y a pas nativement de solution ca me fait doucement rire.

15  3 
Avatar de Uther
L’intérêt c’est que certains langages permettent d’éviter plus facilement certains types erreurs. Parce que le développeur qui peut éviter toutes les d’erreurs, c’est juste une légende.

C’est vrai que comparer directement le nombre de bug n’est pas forcément pertinent vu que généralement ils ne sont pas utilisés dans le même contexte. Par contre, comparer les types d’erreur par langage a beaucoup de sens car certains types d’erreurs sont moins facile voire impossible a faire dans certains langages, c’est utile de savoir où porter son attention en priorité suivant le langage qu’on utilise.

11  0 
Avatar de SimonDecoline
Quelqu’un a lu le rapport en question ?
Personnellement, j’aurais bien voulu mais je refuse de laisser mon mail pour vérifier si une boite qui vend de la sécurité a raison de nous alarmer sur le manque de sécurité.

7  0 
Avatar de Uther
Citation Envoyé par Jeff_67 Voir le message

Mauvais titre ! Ça devait être « Les applications web dans le cloud sont de plus en plus défaillantes… ». Ce n’est pas le langage de programmation qui est en cause ici, mais l’approche dans sa globalité.

Ce n’est clairement pas ce qu’on peut déduire de ce rapport qui traite uniquement de code dans le cloud et ne le compare pas avec du code développé de manière classique. Vous n’aimez pas le cloud, peut-être avec de bonnes raison, mais ça n’est pas le sujet ici.

Citation Envoyé par ok.Idriss Voir le message
Je reste très mitigé sur la pertinence de ce genre d’étude. Vu la liste des langages cités, on a dans les quoi… 60 à 80% du parc logiciel mondial ? Donc en mettant de côté les considérations « c’est les devs, les commerciaux, le langage le responsable », il est de toute façon statistiquement normal que la majorité des logiciels défaillants soient réalisés avec les langages majoritairement utilisés.

Bref on est pas loin du « 100% des consommateurs ont acheté le produit » en terme d’étude…

Je pense pas que le but soit de dire que tous les logiciels sont défaillants. Normalement tout les développeurs sont au courant, même si ça ne semble pas totalement inutile à rappeler.
Le but de la publication de ce rapport est en bien sûr avant tout publicitaire. Si la société présente bien gracieusement ses résultats, c’est une manière de mettre en avant son produit d’analyse. Il ne s’agit pas d’une analyse scientifique rigoureuse. Juste des chiffres brut des résultats de l’outil sans analyse des biais possibles dans les entrées.

Citation Envoyé par defZero Voir le message
Cette étude est-elle pertinente ou pas ?Ca dépend de si vous considérez que c’est de la faute du langage, s’il y a des bugs dans vos apps .
Si vous choisissez les bons langages, pour les bons projets, en théorie et sous réserve de les maitriser, il n’y a pas de raison que l’un soit plus « buge-ogéne » qu’un autre.

Ça fait beaucoup de conditions dont certaines sont à peu près sures de ne pas être remplies dans la pratique, parce que le nombre de développeurs de disponibles qui maitrisent parfaitement un sujet est limité, et que même les experts ne sont pas infaillible et finiront par laisser passer des erreurs sur une base de code suffisamment complexe. Donc avoir des outils et des langages qui peuvent empêcher certaines erreurs peut toujours s’avérer utile.

Citation Envoyé par defZero Voir le message

Après comme noté à de nombreuse fois dans les commentaire précédent, c’est évident que certaines class de bug sont dépendante des domaines dans lesquelles les langages sont utilisés.

Le domaine à son importance : c’est sur qu’on aura pas d’erreur XSS dans une appli non web. Mais même dans un domaine identique le langage a un impact. Pour une appli identique en C++ ou en Java, on pourra avoir des problèmes de sécurité dus à un buffer overflow en C++ alors qu’en Java c’est strictement impossible.

Citation Envoyé par Eric80 Voir le message
encore une étude qui semble mélanger corrélation et causalité!

Comparer des défaillances des langages sans parler du champ d’utilisation des logiciels fait avec ces langages ne permet pas de conclure quoi que se soit, sauf comme dit scandinave qu’un langage utilisé pour A aura plus de failles liées à A et qu un autre pour B aura des failles pour B…

Je crois surtout que c’est l’article qui essaie de faire dire des choses au rapport qu’il ne prétend pas. Il ne s’agit en aucun cas d’une étude scientifique rigoureuse mais d’un rapport des résultats d’un outil sur la base de code soumise par les clients. Ces chiffres peuvent être intéressant mais il faut prendre en compte tous les biais possible que cette situation entraine.

Citation Envoyé par walfrat Voir le message
Je suis curieux comment le Javascript peu avoir une courbe aussi basse sur la qualité de code.

Pour moi elle devrait pas être si différente de Java/C#/PHP car ils vont ensemble dans le cas d’appli web.

Je me suis fait la même remarque. Si le Java et le C# offrent quand même un langage plus structuré qui peut prévenir certaines erreurs, le JavaScript n’offre pas plus que le PHP du point de vue sécurité.

Je pense que ça doit s’expliquer par un biais quelconque dans les données en entrée du rapport. Encore une fois une vraie étude devrait faire attention de traiter des données comparables, ici ça n’est pas le cas. Vu que la qualité du code soumis n’est pas forcément similaire, on peut par exemple supposer que les application PHP correspondent a des projet plus anciens qui datent d’une époque ou la sécurité n’était pas un préoccupation. Si le nombre de client étudiés n’est pas assez élevé il peut aussi tout simplement y avoir un facteur chance. Le rapport ne montre que les erreurs relevés par l’outil. On peut aussi supposer que l’outil est plus efficace pour détecter des erreurs PHP que JavaScript.

Globalement, je pense que ce rapport n’est pas vraiment intéressant pour comparer les langage entre eux vu que les projets comparés ne sont pas forcément équivalent.

7  0 
Avatar de foetus
Citation Envoyé par defZero Voir le message

Très concrètement les langages n’ont pas vraiment d’incidences sur les qualités du code, SI vous avez des devs avec de la bouteille derrière.

on peut te retourner ton argument : plus 1 langage est facile à prendre en main, et plus il y a des « juniors » qui l’utilisent (<- c’est d’ailleurs le but recherché)

C’est le cas du PHP

Python est aussi 1 langage facile à apprendre. Mais je pense que c’est le domaine (R&D) qui fait que de bons développeurs l’utilisent. JavaScript me semble à 1 sale réputation et est « transcompilé » avec TypeScript.

Citation Envoyé par defZero Voir le message
Ca dépend de si vous considérez que c’est de la faute du langage, s’il y a des bugs dans vos apps . Si vous choisissez les bons langages, pour les bons projets, en théorie et sous réserve de les maitriser, il n’y a pas de raison que l’un soit plus « buge-ogéne » qu’un autre.

Après comme noté à de nombreuse fois dans les commentaire précédent, c’est évident que certaines class de bug sont dépendante des domaines dans lesquelles les langages sont utilisés.

Bof il faut remarquer que seul le C++ à des problèmes/ erreurs liés au « matériel » (dépassement de tampon, gestion des erreurs, …)
Les autres qui sont derrière des machines virtuelles ou des serveurs, ont tous des problèmes/ erreurs MÉTIER.

Donc, oui le langage est important . Et ce n’est pas pour rien que depuis 2011 le C++ évolue tous les 3 ans (C++11, C++14, C++17, C++20) pour supprimer cet écueil pour arriver à ce que les développeurs ne se concentrent que sur le métier.

On peut aussi parler des « sucres syntaxiques ». Par exemple le langage go c’est du C qui permet de faire du concurrentiel très facilement.

6  0 
Avatar de Eric80
encore une étude qui semble mélanger corrélation et causalité!

Comparer des défaillances des langages sans parler du champ d’utilisation des logiciels fait avec ces langages ne permet pas de conclure quoi que se soit, sauf comme dit scandinave qu’un langage utilisé pour A aura plus de failles liées à A et qu un autre pour B aura des failles pour B…

6  0 
Avatar de Aurelien.Regat-Barrel
Citation Envoyé par Jeff_67 Voir le message

Cessons de nous voiler la face, passer d’un client lourd à une appli web dans le cloud apporte plus de problèmes que cela n’en résout.

Histoire d’être un peu plus constructif que cette assertion qui n’engage que toi, je dirais plutôt : passer d’un client lourd à une appli web dans le cloud expose les développeurs à tout un tas de nouveaux problèmes. Mais aussi à tout un tas d’avantages.

Chaque approche a ses avantages et inconvénients, ses coûts et bénéfices. Peser le pour et le contre de chaque solution, argumenter de façon factuelle ses choix d’archi, c’est précisément là que se trouve l’aspect ingénierie de notre métier. Ca va de pair avec une vision stratégique claire et précise du projet, d’où l’importance de la communication entre les équipes. Beaucoup d’échecs sont à chercher de ce côté là plus que dans une façon de coder. Ou dit autrement : la bonne utilisation d’une techno adaptée au besoin dépend beaucoup de la culture d’entreprise en place.

6  1 
Avatar de DuyBinh
Citation Envoyé par Aurelien.Regat-Barrel Voir le message
Histoire d’être un peu plus constructif que cette assertion qui n’engage que toi, je dirais plutôt : passer d’un client lourd à une appli web dans le cloud expose les développeurs à tout un tas de nouveaux problèmes. Mais aussi à tout un tas d’avantages.

Chaque approche a ses avantages et inconvénients, ses coûts et bénéfices. Peser le pour et le contre de chaque solution, argumenter de façon factuelle ses choix d’archi, c’est précisément là que se trouve l’aspect ingénierie de notre métier. Ca va de pair avec une vision stratégique claire et précise du projet, d’où l’importance de la communication entre les équipes. Beaucoup d’échecs sont à chercher de ce côté là plus que dans une façon de coder. Ou dit autrement : la bonne utilisation d’une techno adaptée au besoin dépend beaucoup de la culture d’entreprise en place.

Voilà, faut arrêter d’être extrémiste mais comme ce boulot est blindé de commerciaux (je parle commerciaux aussi dans le sens un petit chef IT qui croit qu’il est balaise et vend ça à la direction pour avoir du budget et donc augmenter sa visibilité) qui veulent vendre tout et n’importe quoi, tu te retrouves avec des applications web là où c’est pas forcément nécessaire (au hasard une appli intranet qui remplace un classeur Excel que gère 10 gus dans un open space ).

4  0 
Avatar de Jeff_67
Mauvais titre ! Ça devait être « Les applications web dans le cloud sont de plus en plus défaillantes… ». Ce n’est pas le langage de programmation qui est en cause ici, mais l’approche dans sa globalité.

Cessons de nous voiler la face, passer d’un client lourd à une appli web dans le cloud apporte plus de problèmes que cela n’en résout. Le troll ultime, c’est de devoir maîtriser 3 langages (HTML/CSS/JS) rien que pour faire une UI correcte, là où il existe des éditeurs visuels qui rendent la conception de l’interface triviale pour les applis de bureau.

11  8 

http://www.developpez.com/actu/311701/Les-applications-PHP-Cplusplus-Java-et-NET-sont-les-plus-frequemment-defaillantes-selon-un-rapport-de-Veracode/

Sent with Reeder

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Adobe Flash is Officially Dead After 25 Years With Content Blocked Starting Today

MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors Adobe Flash is Officially Dead After 25 Years With Content Blocked Starting Today

A few weeks ago, Adobe dropped support for Flash Player and continued to strongly recommend that all users immediately uninstall the browser plugin for security reasons. And starting today, Adobe has gone one step further and blocked Flash content entirely.


When a user attempts to load a Flash game or content in a browser such as Chrome, the content now fails to load and instead displays a small banner that leads to the Flash end-of-life page on Adobe’s website. While this day has long been coming, with many browsers disabling Flash by default years ago, it is officially the end of a 25-year era for Flash, first introduced by Macromedia in 1996 and acquired by Adobe in 2005.

« Since Adobe will no longer be supporting Flash Player after December 31, 2020 and Adobe will block Flash content from running in Flash Player beginning January 12, 2021, Adobe strongly recommends all users immediately uninstall Flash Player to help protect their systems, » the page reads. Adobe has instructions for uninstalling Flash on Mac, but note that Apple removed support for Flash outright in Safari 14 last year.

Adobe first announced its plans to discontinue Flash in 2017. « Open standards such as HTML5, WebGL, and WebAssembly have continually matured over the years and serve as viable alternatives for Flash content, » the company explained.

Adobe does not intend to issue Flash Player updates or security patches any longer, so it is recommended that users uninstall the plugin.

Over the years, Flash had an infamous reputation due to numerous security vulnerabilities that exposed Mac and PC users to malware and other risks, forcing vendors like Microsoft and Apple to work tirelessly to keep up with security fixes.

Apple’s co-founder and former CEO Steve Jobs offered his « Thoughts on Flash » in a 2010 open letter, criticizing Adobe’s software for its poor reliability, security, and performance. Jobs also said that Apple « cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers. »

Flash’s discontinuation should not heavily impact most users since many popular browsers have already moved away from the plugin. Additionally, iPhone and iPad users are not affected by the change, as iOS and iPadOS have never supported Flash.

This article, « Adobe Flash is Officially Dead After 25 Years With Content Blocked Starting Today » first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

https://www.macrumors.com/2021/01/12/adobe-flash-era-is-officially-over/

Sent with Reeder

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Graphic Design Average Salary in Canada 2021